Pittsburgh City Paper  (concert preview) CPStaff (Aug 24, 2016)
“Tarana’s music flows with an artful connection despite mixing everything from ambient, flowing loops to catchy Bollywood melodies and beats. Highly recommended viewing. ”  Read More…

AllAboutJazz  Dave Wayne (Nov 8, 2015)

“The influence of iconoclastic visionaries such as Brian Eno, Lee “Scratch” Perry, Bill Laswell, and Nils Petter Molvaer loom large here.  Like Molvaer’s electronica- infused trance music, Tarana’s music moves the body as it tickles the mind.”  Read More…

Classicalite  Mike Greenblatt  (Oct 28, 2015)
“If you had to put a spin on post-rock band Sigur Ros from Reykjavik, Iceland, Jamaican trombone player Vin Gordon (one of reggae’s original rude boys) and the tragic Midwestern electronica pioneer DJ Rashad, it might wind up sounding just like Tarana does on A Fire Of Flowers Grows Around Us. Not that Tarana actually sounds like them. The point is; they sound like nobody. Still, elements of the aforementioned pop up like weeds between city sidewalks. It’s alive. It throbs with static electricity. You can’t stop listening to it. At least I couldn’t..”  
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THUMP | Vice (and audio premiere of “Keherwa”) Alexander Isadarola  (Oct 12, 2015)
“Recorded live, the track was created without any overdubs, and you can really tell in the way it moves gracefully from moment to moment without a clear map of its trajectory, splicing together snippets of acid house, jazz, and psych in a gesture toward vibrant transcendence.”  
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The Big Takeover  Chuck Foster  (Sept 16, 2015)
“Blips and beeps dance over a percussive plane of sonic haze. It’s the same head-scratching genius of Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew, only updated for the technological age.”  
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Tiny Mix Tapes  C. Monster (Sept 8, 2015)
“Off the duo’s newest release, A FIRE OF FLOWERS GROWS AROUND US, Tarana (Ravish Momin & Rick Parker) develops listeners’ hearing with their single, most pleasantly haunting first track, ‘Myvatn.’ ” Read More…

FACTmag  (Music Video Premiere) (Sept 2, 2015)
“The duo Tarana nestles into a fascinating space between jazz, electronica, and the Bollywood and Indian folk music of project founder Ravish Momin’s childhood home. They explore it in length on their upcoming album A Fire Of Flowers Grows Around Us due September 18 via Wondermachine Records, but for now, watch the video by Alexandra Momin for ‘Myvatn’ which uses visual distortion as warped and fluid as the music behind it.” Read More…

Ibero FM 90.9  Yered Garcia (April 30, 2015)

[translated] “To Ravish Momin,the musical composition is an effort that serves as resistance, and claim the true origin of American music: The pastiche of style and technique, ideas and intentions and their respective ways of production and execution together in a land populated by immigrants.” Read More…

La Jornada,  Arturo Arturo Cruz Bárcenas (April 26, 2015)
[translated] “They like to come to Mexico, where they have fans and friends who give them a home. Tarana is a duet trombone / synthesizer and drums / laptop that excites and innovates.”  Read More…

Thump|VICE,  Val Anzaldo  (April 23, 2015)
[translated] ” Their music builds bridges between jazz and electronics, and it is easy to navigate roads that take you floating between both areas. These are sounds that create immersive worlds, with melodies that explode everywhere like fireworks. The duo, consisting of Rick Parker on trombone / synthesizer and Ravish Momin on percussion, has a unique concept of space and rhythm.”  
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El Fanzine,  Miguel Angel Morales  (April 20, 2015)
[translated] “Tarana, comprised Ravish Momin and Rick Parker group, also round the multicultural prism. The pair settled in New York, does not speak of scales, tones or a “jazzy” but the fusion of all expressions and sound musical possibilities.  The references point to multiple artists/genres: Polar Bear, Princess Nokia, Andy Stott, the Heavy Metal Duo (Ray Anderson and Bob Stewart)  and cutting edge DJs in New York City.”
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The Other Night at Quinns (Tarana LIVE review), Mike Faloon (December 31, 2014)
“Momin and Parker  leapfrog across continents and timelines mixing traditional and progressive jazz with dub and Indian influences and electronics—East and West, looking back and looking ahead. Tarana keep conjuring different places, different regions, effortlessly trotting around the globe. My mental map is covered with push pins and a network of criss-crossing yarn. The world feels smaller on a night like this.” 
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Best of 2013: A Person Disguised as People, Ian Doig-Phaneuf (Artistic-Director of LOLAfest, London, Canada)
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TheSoundofConfusion (UK)  (December 24, 2013)
“That said, for an innovative and unique voyage into sound it’s really rather listenable.”Read More… 

Kultur Terrorismus (DE)     Raphael Feldmann (November 12, 2013)
[translated from German] “In such a combination as it is presented by Tarana, probably jazz fusion could function even in the hottest clubs; especially ‘Azeem O Shaan’ could develop there to be a total hit!”  Read More…

DooBeeDooBeeBoo.info, Dawoud Kringle   (September 30, 2012)
“The performance began with Parker creating a soundscape of electronic sounds and samples. Momin responded to the mood that was created with a beat that grew to a full musical structure. Then, the trombone began its melody, and the two explored the possibilities of the composition. Momin’s drums had an endless sense of sympathy and synchronicity with the electronic sounds he and Parker produced. It blurred the lines between the electronic and organic.” Read More…

Creative Sound Radio (France)   (March 10, 2012)
“From the Art Ensemble of Chicago to John Coltrane, from Sun Ra to William Parker, from the world music experiments of Don Cherry to the sound of the Ravish Momin Trio Tarana, from the best british jazz to the Swedish folk jazz, we take your ears on a trip around a Creative Planet.  An around-the-clock journey through Great Black Music, European or asian jazz and global sounds.” Read More…

WNYC Radio (NPR Affiliate, Gig-pick for NYC for 9/23/11), Marlon Bishop (Sept. 23, 2011)
The result is music both composed and improvised that could be easily categorized as jazz, traditional music, electronica, or more likely, some unholy combination of all three.” Read More…